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Wednesday, January 11, 2006

Soap Bubble Fractals

 

Soap bubbles are really fun! Colorful, difficult, reflective, dynamic and delicate. Small bubbles are sturdier, but they have a greater curvature so that the plane of focus becomes a significant issue. Large bubbles are delicate, but easier in the focus issue. I'm still experimenting with a bubble containment field. It consists mainly of wet construction paper. Posted by Picasa

5 comments:

Josh Gentry said...

Wow, that's cool.

Hypatia said...

Isn't it? I always liked the colors on bubbles, but until I caught them, they were in motion so much, I barely appreciated them.

A very cheap 60's flashback.

matt dick said...

Great stuff. How did you keep the glare down? Ar eyou diffusing the flash or just cropping out the glare-y parts?

Hypatia said...

Thanks Matt. A few things actually, lighting's tough with bubbles.

I first made my bubble containment unit out of black wet construction paper.

I located my unit underneath a blank section of ceiling -- any lamps, lights, etc are clearly visible in the top of the bubble.

I aimed the flash at a nearby (not overhead) section of the ceiling for indirect/diffuse light.

I zoomed in like crazy! You can "zoom out" the glare-y parts.

This was one of my first and I cropped out the shadow cast by my lens. Later pictures have little or no cropping. You do have to plan and experiment to get the glare and shadows under control.

I think I'm going to play with some flat soap films because now that I've had some practice, my biggest cropping is spurred by my plane of focus.

matt dick said...

I totally get the plane of focus thing. In the beer-head photos you inspired me to, I had the same issue with the curvature of the glass and my desire for an extremely shallow depth of focus.

I'm going to try oil and water tonight or tomorrow and will probably have to point straight down at a shallow pan of water. We'll see.